PARSlogo

PARS 2021 Conference November 20th

PARS playwork – the pro-child profession

One year on from our first ‘experimental’ 2020 conference, we are very much looking forward to our second PARS playwork conference on International Children’s Day! John Bertelsen, the first playworker at Emdrup, talked about the importance of adults being ‘pro-child’ on adventure playgrounds, which gives us our theme for this year’s conference: PARS – the pro-child profession. In many ways this theme reflects the PARS journey over the last twelve months. As a result of the fantastic energy and support generated by last year’s conference, the growing international PARS community has spent the last 12 months working on the professionalisation of PARS. This means helping those outside the PARS community to recognise our distinctive approach to working with children as legitimate, by adopting a coherent set of shared values, methods, knowledge and practices, on both an individual and group level within the PARS community. This has included setting up administration and assessment teams, becoming an NCFE Award Centre, launching our new PPP4 NCFE accredited qualification and expanding our international training team to 19 PARS Licensed Trainers, working in 9 different countries and delivering PARS training in 5 different languages.

For PARS 2021 we’ve invited academic and practitioner experts from around the world to help us think more about two key questions for professionalising PARS playwork:

  • What does it mean to be ‘pro-child’?
  • What does it mean to be a profession?

Pars 2021 is 12 hours of fascinating approaches to these two questions from diverse practical and theoretical perspectives, from Iceland to Mongolia, from China to Russia, from USA to Australia, and an awful lot of places in between! We welcome anyone interested in the PARS approach to working with children to join us for….

  • Presentations from PARS practitioners and trainers around the world on how they are putting PARS into practice
  • Round table discussions on our key questions with expert academics, practitioners and policy makers
  • Presentations on the theory of being pro-child by international scholars in areas such as children’s rights, childism and historical perspectives on childhood.
  • Presentations on the practice of being pro-child by international scholars in areas such as reflexivity, risk-taking and the Play Cycle

…and much more! You can download the conference programme here and find out more about the sessions and individual speakers below.

PARS 2021 is an online, 12 hour conference and is open to anyone interested in the PARS playwork approach to working with children.

 

Our Speakers

Jennifer cartmel
Dr Jennifer Cartmel is an Associate Professor at Griffith University, Australia. Her academic research focus is with school-age childcare services. Jennifer completed the first PhD on the topic in Australia and continues to contribute expert advice to the sector.
Dr Jennifer Cartmel
Australia
Marilyn Casley
Dr Marilyn Casely is Lecturer in Child and Family Studies in the School of Human Services and Social Work. Marilyn has extensive experience working with children’s services, and providing professional development for practitioners working in children’s services.
Dr Marilyn Casley
Australia
Jennifer Wong-Powell
Dr Jennifer Wong-Powell is the Founder of JWP Consulting. There is an urgency to restore play in early childhood education, and this is what Jennifer is passionate about.
Dr Jennifer Wong-Powell
Mongolia
Kylie
Kylie Branelly is the Chief Executive Officer of the Queensland Children’s Activities Network (QCAN) and Chairperson of the National Outside School Hours Services Alliance in Australia. Kylie has been involved in the Education and Care Services sector in various support, advocacy and leadership roles for more than 30 years.
Kylie Branelly
Australia
Martin van Rooijen
Martin van Rooijen is a doctoral candidate at the University of Humanistic Studies, Utrecht, the Netherlands, and currently works as an independent pedagogue, researcher, consultant on nature play and as a writer and trainer.
Martin van Rooijen
The Netherlands
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Dr Keith Cranwell
UK
Linda Shaw
Dr Linda Shaw is a Senior Lecturer in child development and education at Oxford Brookes University. Linda teaches undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in childhood and youth studies, specialising in research methods and sociology of childhood.
Dr Linda Shaw
UK
Susan Chlebowski
Susan Chlebowski is a certified Montessori teacher and forest school leader who studies and teaches research-based models of living and learning that honour a child's right to play and experience nature as part of a healthy, happy childhood.
Susan Chlebowski
USA
John Wall, Rutgers photo
Professor John Wall is Professor of Philosophy, Religion, and Childhood Studies at Rutgers University Camden, US. He is a theoretical ethicist who researches moral life's relation to language, power, culture, childhoods, and children's rights.
Professor John Wall
USA
Ada photo 1
Ada Wong has 15 years experience of providing training in various kindergartens, professional bodies, tertiary institute, NGOs and government departments.
Ada Wong
Hong Kong
Rarni Rothwell
Rarni is an educational leader who spent most of her 26 year career working out of a school based service in South East Queensland, Australia.
Rarni Rothwell
Australia
Rebekah
Rebekah Jackson is a childcare, early years and playwork consultant and trainer with over 15 years of experience supporting the development of children’s childcare and out of school settings in both England and Wales.
Rebekah Jackson
UK
Caron2
QIAN Zheng (Caron) 钱铮 is the founder of the Shanghai Playwork Fund, Shanghai United Foundation.
Zheng Qian (Caron)
Mainland China
IMG_20191016_174616 (3)
Dr Shelly Newstead created the PARS playwork model as part of her doctoral research at the UCL Institute of Education, London, and has been appointed as an Adjunct Research Fellow at Griffith University, Brisbane Australia.
Dr Shelly Newstead
UK
EB porttrett
Professor Ellen Beate Hansen Sandseter is a Professor in the Department of Physical Education and Health at Queen Maud University College of Early Childhood Education (QMUC) in Trondheim, Norway.
Professor Ellen B. Sandseter
Norway
Dr Pete King
Dr Pete King is a senior lecturer and researcher at Swansea University and the programme director for the MA Developmental and Therapeutic Play course.
Dr Pete King
UK
Andrew Shoolbread
Andrew has been working with the Scottish Out of School Care Network (SOSCN), the national intermediary charitable organisation representing school-age childcare in Scotland, since 2001.
Andrew Shoolbread
UK
Picture 1
Professor, D.Sc. of Pedagogic Sciences, Head of the Pedagogy Department at the Institute of Psychology and Education in Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan, 420021, Russia. Honored Scientist of the Republic of Tatarstan.
Prof. Roza A.Valeeva
Russia
Doug
Doug is in his tenth year as General Secretary and Treasurer of the GFTU. He is the organisation's longest serving Executive member having first been elected to the EC in 1995.
Doug Nicholls
UK
20210506_130810
I have been married almost 26 years, have 4 kids and 2 grandchildren. I always knew I would be a teacher of some sort, but I never realized I’d do most of my learning from the children.
Heather Boomhower
Canada
Baptiste pic
Baptiste is a postdoctoral researcher at Université de Brest (France) working currently on residential school trips and outdoor education.
Dr Baptiste Besse-Patin
France
kolbrun 2020
Kolbrún Þ. Pálsdóttir is Dean of the School of Education at the University of Iceland, Reykjavik. She works with her colleagues to create a vibrant educational community with young people who have a passion to become professionals and future leaders within formal and informal education settings.
Associate Prof. Kolbrún Þ. Pálsdóttir
Iceland
Peter Kraftl
Peter Kraftl is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Birmingham.
Professor Peter Kraftl
UK
Dr-Fikile-Nxumalo-1
Dr. Fikile Nxumalo is an assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching & Learning at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her work is centered on environmental and place-attuned early childhood education that is situated within and responsive to children's inheritances of settler colonialism, anti-Blackness and environmental precarity. Her book, Decolonizing Place in Early Childhood Education (Routledge, 2019) examines the entanglements of place, environmental education, childhood, race, and settler colonialism in early learning contexts on unceded Coast Salish territories.
Dr Fikile Nxumalo
Canada
RickPic
Rick Worch, Ph.D., is a professor in the Inclusive Early Childhood Education Program at Bowling Green State University in the United States.
Professor Rick Worch
USA
photo Janet Scott
Janet Scott
UK
Dr Chan
Dr CHAN Po Lin, Pauline is a currently serving senior lecturer under the Early Childhood Education Department of The Education University of Hong Kong.
Dr Pauline Chan
Hong Kong
Naomi pic
'Naomi is an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, Faculty of Law
Dr Naomi Lott
UK
Jonathan McCloud (1)
Dr. Jonathan McCloud received his PhD in Curriculum & Instruction with emphasis on Educational Psychology from Virginia Tech in 2015. His research and teaching have included topics such as peer observation of teaching in higher education, play in educational settings, and early childhood education. Jonathan’s scholarly pursuits are linked by an expression of respect and care for the individual, and he is most interested in ways that play is fostered through democratic structures and agentive practices. Jonathan’s work with pre-service and professional educators focuses on how to reflect on one’s underlying assumptions of the teacher/adult role in the educational environment. Jonathan finds PARS playwork to be a natural extension of these pursuits as it aims to compensate children for the presence of adults in their time and space. Jonathan is a former classical guitarist and enjoys learning about Mister Rogers, cooking, and gardening. He also likes sunshine on his shoulders.
Dr Jonathan McCloud
USA
Grant Lambie Photo1
Grant Lambie is an independent free play advocate, who has been involved in over 45 UK adventure playgrounds, (plus schools, parks and estates play areas) over the last 20 years.
Grant Lambie
UK
Schüpbach
Professor Marianne Schüpbach is a chair in Primary Education at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.
Professor Marianne Schüpbach
Germany
Janine Dodge
Janine Dodge is currently a Director of the International Play Association (IPA) in Brazil. Formerly President, she has been guiding IPA Brasil in the development and expansion of their playwork training program since 2015. IPA Brasil offers the only certified Professional Qualification in Play Agents course in Brazil. She is a recognized speaker about play and coauthor of several publications, including the book, A Descoberta do Brincar ("The Discovery of Play"), documenting a national research initiative about play and the Brazilian family. Prior to joining IPA, Janine had a successful 20-year career as an executive and director in large multinationals in Brazil, Canada, the US and Chile. She has a degree in International Relations from the University of Toronto, an MBA from the Schulich School of Business and is a certified Master Integral Coach. She is the proud mother of 3 teen-age children, Luc, Sabrina and Alec.
Janine Dodge
Brazil
Translate »
0
    0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop

    Talking Circles

    Jennifer cartmel
    Her academic research focus is with school-age childcare services. Jennifer completed the first PhD on the topic in Australia and continues to contribute expert advice to the sector. Jennifer was commissioned in 2010 by the Australian Department of Education to write the first National Framework for School Age Care. Jennifer’s research contributes to increasing professionalisation across the school-age childcare workforce working closely with Australian state governments and peak associations (National Out of Hours Services Alliance) to deepen understanding about the features of delivering services to school age children.
    Dr Jennifer Cartmel
    Australia
    Marilyn Casley
    Marilyn has extensive experience working with children’s services, and providing professional development for practitioners working in children’s services. Marilyn is a designer and facilitator of conversational processes and experiential learning programs. Marilyn’s research interests focus around using conversational processes to develop resilience, participatory skills and leadership with children and young people. Marilyn is also known for the development of pedagogical leadership and integrated practice in children’s and human services
    Dr Marilyn Casley
    Australia

    Talking circles are designed to encourage children to ask questions about their social purpose and how they can make a difference. In the Talking Circle children explore and play with ideas and concepts through talking and listening. The ‘talking circle’ framework is characterised by ancient wisdom and systems thinking where shared learning spaces for diverse individuals are created in order for the group to build relationships and make the connections. This means individually share what each other knows so that together they can act as a ‘whole’ to co-create new opportunities and innovative ideas.

    The facilitator provides the time and space for children to talk about the things that matter to them. The children are co-constructors of knowledge in partnership with the facilitator, giving them control over the agenda of the talking circle, which in turn, encourages them to become creators of their own future.

    Jennifer and Marilyn foreground critical reflection as both a research approach and a tool for professional development. They received federal funding to develop a resource for workplace capacity building through critical reflection Leading Learning Circles for Educators engaged in Study and this is used in the children’s services sector. Simultaneously Jennifer and Marilyn to develop a resource to use with children, Talking Circles. In this presentation they will share the value of and the process for using Talking Circles with all ages of children.

    Image of Childhood: The Mongolian Context

    Jennifer Wong-Powell
    There is an urgency to restore play in early childhood education, and this is what Jennifer is passionate about. In a world of both unimaginable opportunities and great uncertainties, Jennifer believes that restoring play in education is key for children to be able to develop the character and competencies needed to face what the future holds. Jennifer is the founder of JWP Consulting - Inspired by Children and she can be reached at: jlwongpowell@gmail.com
    Dr Jennifer Wong-Powell
    Mongolia

    Capable, competent and full of potential: words we may use to describe the child. Freedom,
    independence and opportunity: words we may use to refer to the nomadic lifestyle. This
    presentation investigates nomadic traditions and beliefs to understand the image of
    childhood in Mongolia. Culture, language and the natural environment merge to provide
    children with opportunities to learn and develop free from adult-defined boundaries. The
    end result is confidence, agency and empowerment. Questions explored during this
    presentation include:
    -How might the nomadic lifestyle shape the image of childhood in Mongolia?
    -How might changes and urbanization present new opportunities for children’s learning?
    -What learnings might we take away from the Mongolian image of childhood?

    Developing Australia’s first Certificate III in Outside School Hours Care

    CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN PROFESSIONALISING THE OUT OF SCHOOL SECTOR

    Kylie
    Kylie Branelly is the Chief Executive Officer of the Queensland Children’s Activities Network (QCAN) and Chairperson of the National Outside School Hours Services Alliance in Australia. Kylie has been involved in the Education and Care Services sector in various support, advocacy and leadership roles for more than 30 years. Kylie has been an advisor to Australia’s government on pertinent policy and program issues for the sector, representing OSHC on both Federal and State level Advisory forums. Kylie appreciates the opportunity to work together with other organisations in both government and non-government sectors to advance OSHC (and ultimately the opportunity for children to play!). Kylie holds a Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood), Master of Education (Special Education) and has an ongoing commitment to professional learning and development.
    Kylie Branelly
    Australia
    In Australia, there are no nationally agreed or consistent approaches to qualifications for the Out of School sector. Instead, qualifications for the sector are mandated at a jurisdictional level by State and Territory governments. Due to a lack of sector-specific entry-level qualifications, ‘early childhood’ studies have frequently been accessed to qualify educators for work in OSHC.


    Significant reforms to these early childhood qualifications have resulted in them no longer being considered fit for purpose as a vocational placement for students undertaking these courses and working in the Outside School Hours Care (OSHC) sector. As a result, the Queensland Children’s Activities Network were approved by the Australian Skills Quality Authority to develop the country’s first Certificate III in Outside School Hours Care.

    This presentation will discuss the process for developing an OSHC specific Certificate III Accredited Course under the Australian Qualifications Framework including the packaging requirements for accreditation.

    The right to a bruise: connecting the work of Janusz Korczak to children’s risk-taking in play

    Martin van Rooijen
    Martin van Rooijen is a doctoral candidate at the University of Humanistic Studies, Utrecht, the Netherlands, and currently works as an independent pedagogue, researcher, consultant on nature play and as a writer and trainer. Since the 2000s he was a community worker for youth in disadvantaged neighborhoods and worked as a practicing playground worker and was the coordinator of the professional team in two ‘building playgrounds’ in the city of Utrecht. In 2013 Martin obtained his Master’s degree with honors in (Ecological) Pedagogy (MEd), with a thesis on ‘Parents and risky play’. His current research interests include risk-taking in children’s play, the resilience of children in outdoor environments and normative professionalism of pedagogues with children in their care. He is involved in Dutch networks on nature play and children’s play rights, and is member of the Dutch Korczak Foundation.
    Martin van Rooijen
    The Netherlands

    In my PhD research I am investigating influencing factors on professional attitudes towards children’s risk-taking in play. Pedagogical foundations can play an important role in the beliefs playwork practitioners develop towards challenging play. I will introduce the principles of the Polish educationalist Janusz Korczak, a doctor in Poland at the beginning of the 20th century. He was known as a pedagogue and principal of an orphanage where he organized initiatives with children focusing on their responsibility. Korczak formulated several children’s rights, long before the United Nations did. One of these is the right of a child to his own death: ‘From fear that death will take our child away, we deprive our child his life; because we do not want it to die, we will not allow it to live’ (Korczak, 1984, p 50). This is not to take literally, Korczak state adult’s perception of risk in play may be based on fear, and sometimes they see dangers that are not there. We will discuss dilemmas on facilitating children’s risk-taking in play and how children’s rights and pedagogy can give playworkers a foundation to their daily practice.

    Martin is appointed to the board of the International Journal of Playwork Practice, member of the Dutch branch of the IPA (International Play Association), member of the Special Interest Group Outdoor Play & Learning of the EECERA (European Early Childhood & Education Research Association) and has built up an international network towards the subject of ‘risky play’. Martin published articles in several Dutch professional journals and is co-author on the ‘Position paper on Risky Play’ in collaboration with the Dutch Consumer Safety Institute (2017). He also  contributed on the discussion paper ‘Advancing Outdoor Play and Early Childhood Education’ from the Canadian Lawson Foundation (2019).

    Disrupting Childhood: A playful hunt for childness in historical and sociology contexts

    Linda Shaw
    Dr Linda Shaw is a Senior Lecturer in child development and education at Oxford Brookes University. Linda teaches undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in childhood and youth studies, specialising in research methods and sociology of childhood. Her special interests are in poststructural feminism and the tensions between theory and practice in work with children and young people. Linda has a background in social policy, including ten years working as an advisor and project lead for a Local Authority in the English Midlands. She has carried out ethnographic studies in early years' provision, schools, out of school settings and holiday playschemes. Recent publications include Shaw, L. (2020). Play spaces as heterotopia. International Journal of Playwork Practice 5:1 https://scholarworks.bgsu.edu/ijpp/ and Shaw, L.J. (2020) Imagining playwork using sociological perspectives from Mills, Foucault and Gordon. in King P. and Newstead S.(eds.) Further perspectives on researching play from a playwork perspective: process, playfulness, rights-based and critical reflection. London: Routledge.
    Linda Shaw
    UK

    Ambert (1986) commented on the near absence of studies on children in mainstream sociology. Since then, a number of key strands have emerged from historical and sociological research into children and childhood, specifically the concepts of childhood as a social construct; children as agents and structural approaches to children as citizens (Mayall, 2013).  Drawing on PhD research from 2017 and an evolving interest in playwork as a ‘missing in action’ field for mainstream sociology, this paper examines the potential of post-structural and feminist paradigms for turning a critical lens on the importance of playwork in research which is pro-child in the sense of constructing children as active citizens who should have a voice in society, political decision making and matters pertaining to social justice. The methods used are primarily auto ethnographic, drawing on stories of play both contemporary and historical with the stated intention of disrupting thinking, including my own assumptions, about the role of research, researchers and dominant discourses in work and play with children and young people. Findings relate to the possibility of (re)viewing, by which I mean looking again, at children as a social group in their own right, with the same complex personhoods and intersectionality’s as groups of adults made visible by research and social activism. The aim is not to discount other ways of accounting for childhood but to make them more visible in order to consider new possibilities for enactments of social practices in spaces in which adults and children encounter one another.

    Benefits of play in children's lives

    Susan Chlebowski
    Susan Chlebowski is a certified Montessori teacher and forest school leader who studies and teaches research-based models of living and learning that honor a child's right to play and experience nature as part of a healthy, happy childhood. Her most recent focus work is outreach and advocacy to ensure that all children have access to the evidence-based practices of play and nature-based learning.
    Susan Chleowski
    USA

    As the research stacks up about the benefits of play in children’s lives, the programs available to make authentic, child-led play available to all children are woefully lacking. One solution is to ensure that the play and playwork curriculum is an essential component in the preparation of teacher candidates. This presentation describes a covid-inspired PARS training / Forest School Practicum that provided a unique opportunity for university teacher candidates to learn the PARS model and practice “playwork in the woods” with local children. 

    The Childist Imagination

    John Wall, Rutgers photo
    John Wall is Professor of Philosophy, Religion, and Childhood Studies at Rutgers University Camden, US. He is a theoretical ethicist who researches moral life's relation to language, power, culture, childhoods, and children's rights. He is author of the forthcoming Give Children the Vote: On Democratizing Democracy, as well as Children's Rights: Today's Global Challenge, Ethics in Light of Childhood, and Moral Creativity. He is co-editor of numerous books, including the forthcoming 36-chapter Handbook of Theories in Childhood Studies. He founded and directs Rutgers University's Childism Institute, a global project to develop child-responsive theory, research, and activism. And he is Co-Founder of the Children's Voting Colloquium, an international coalition working to eliminate the voting age.
    John Wall
    USA

    Marginalized groups in societies, whether by gender, race, class, disability, or in other ways, often seek to overcome their historical disempowerment by developing systemic critiques of wider social norms. For the most part, however, while children and youth are also a marginalized group in many respects, there is no widespread movement either in academia or societies to make similar critiques of adultist or patriarchal systems. This presentation develops a concept of childism, in analogy to (and learning from) feminism, antiracism, and the like, that can build on critical childhood studies to provide a lens for the systematic critique of social and scholarly norms and structures in response to the diversely lived experiences of children. The result is a powerful tool, not only for understanding children’s lives, but also for transforming the larger societal contexts that underpin their invisiblization but also their potential for greater inclusion.

    Ada Wong

    Ada photo 1
    Ada Wong has 15 years experience of providing training in various kindergartens, professional bodies, tertiary institute, NGOs and government departments.
    Ada Wong
    Hong Kong

    Ada Wong has 15 years experience of providing training in various kindergartens, professional bodies, tertiary institute, NGOs and government departments. She holds a Certificate in Hospital Play and has visited adventure playgrounds around the world. Ada is currently working with EUHK in Hong Kong to develop PARS training in higher education.

    Rarni Rothwell

    Rarni Rothwell
    Rarni is an educational leader who spent most of her 26 year career working out of a school based service in South East Queensland, Australia. Since beginning an Action Research journey in 2010, she has relished in sharing the profound insights this unique form of professional development offers across various formal and informal formats. Since mid-2014 Rarni has explored her fascinations including reconnecting children with nature, capacity building through risk, embedding sustainable practices and the magic of playwork in a slightly different off-the-wall context. Rarni enjoys regularly collaborating, advocating and playing with her colleagues from across all early childhood education and care service types and has the pleasure of working as Lead Trainer for the Queensland Children’s Activities Network, Australia.
    Rarni Rothwell
    Australia

    Rarni is an educational leader who spent most of her 26 year career working out of a school based service in South East Queensland, Australia. Since beginning an Action Research journey in 2010, she has relished in sharing the profound insights this unique form of professional development offers across various formal and informal formats. Since mid-2014 Rarni has explored her fascinations including reconnecting children with nature, capacity building through risk, embedding sustainable practices and the magic of playwork in a slightly different off-the-wall context. Rarni enjoys regularly collaborating, advocating and playing with her colleagues from across all early childhood education and care service types and has the pleasure of working as Lead Trainer for the Queensland Children’s Activities Network, Australia.

    Rebekah Jackson

    Rebekah Jackson
    Rebekah Jackson is a childcare, early years and playwork consultant and trainer with over 15 years of experience supporting the development of children’s childcare and out of school settings in both England and Wales. Rebekah stumbled across playwork early in her career working with children and young people and completed her MA in Play and Playwork at University of Gloucestershire. Rebekah founded her company The Bold Type Ltd after working as childcare strategic lead for a council in Wales. She is a trustee for Wrexham Youth and Play Partnership and a member of the Editorial Board for the International Journal of Playwork Practice.
    Rebekah Jackson
    UK

    Rebekah Jackson is a childcare, early years and playwork consultant and trainer with over 15 years of experience supporting the development of children’s childcare and out of school settings in both England and Wales. Rebekah stumbled across playwork early in her career working with children and young people and completed her MA in Play and Playwork at University of Gloucestershire. Rebekah founded her company The Bold Type Ltd after working as childcare strategic lead for a council in Wales. She is a trustee for Wrexham Youth and Play Partnership and a member of the Editorial Board for the International Journal of Playwork Practice.

    Zheng Qian (Caron)

    Caron2
    QIAN Zheng (Caron) 钱铮 is the founder of the Shanghai Playwork Fund, Shanghai United Foundation. She was first introduced to playwork in 2015 when she undertook the Certificate of Playwork Practice in Hong Kong. Caron is now working to bring the PARS model to people who work with children across China by organizing and delivering PARS tailor-made training courses and PARS Masterclasses. She is also developing playwork projects in local communities to provide time and space for children to enjoy more free play. Caron obtained her Masters degree in Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights at University College London (UCL).
    Zheng Qian (Caron)
    Mainland China

    QIAN Zheng (Caron) 钱铮 is the founder of the Shanghai Playwork Fund, Shanghai United Foundation. She was first introduced to playwork in 2015 when she undertook the Certificate of Playwork Practice in Hong Kong. Caron is now working to bring the PARS model to people who work with children across China by organizing and delivering PARS tailor-made training courses and PARS Masterclasses. She is also developing playwork projects in local communities to provide time and space for children to enjoy more free play. Caron obtained her Masters degree in Sociology of Childhood and Children’s Rights at University College London (UCL).

    Dr Shelly Newstead

    IMG-20190702-WA0008 (2)
    Dr Shelly Newstead created the PARS playwork model as part of her doctoral research at the UCL Institute of Education, London, and has been appointed as an Adjunct Research Fellow at Griffith University, Brisbane Australia. Shelly has worked in the playwork field for nearly thirty years as a practitioner, trainer, author, editor, publisher and researcher. She is the Series Editor for Advances in Playwork Research (Routledge) and the Managing Editor of International Journal of Playwork Practice. She is also currently the President of the International Council for Children’s Play (ICCP) and her research interests include the history of playwork and the development of empirical evidence about playwork practice. Shelly is also the author of the popular Busker’s Guide to Playwork which has sold over 12,000 copies worldwide and is now also available in Japanese.
    Dr Shelly Newstead
    UK
    Dr Shelly Newstead created the PARS playwork model as part of her doctoral research at the UCL Institute of Education, London, and has been appointed as an Adjunct Research Fellow at Griffith University, Brisbane Australia. Shelly has worked in the playwork field for nearly thirty years as a practitioner, trainer, author, editor, publisher and researcher. She is the Series Editor for Advances in Playwork Research (Routledge) and the Managing Editor of International Journal of Playwork Practice. She is also currently the President of the International Council for Children’s Play (ICCP) and her research interests include the history of playwork and the development of empirical evidence about playwork practice. Shelly is also the author of the popular Busker’s Guide to Playwork which has sold over 12,000 copies worldwide and is now also available in Japanese.
     

    Norwegian context of out of school care and activities

    EB porttrett
    Professor Ellen Beate Hansen Sandseter is a Professor in the Department of Physical Education and Health at Queen Maud University College of Early Childhood Education (QMUC) in Trondheim, Norway. Her primary research focus is on children's physical play, outdoor play, and risky/thrilling play among children in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) institutions, as well as how to develop physical environments for children's play, development and learning. She has also been involved in research on Norwegian children's experiences of participation and well-being in Norwegian ECEC institutions, and projects about safety work, child injuries and injury prevention in Norwegian ECEC institutions.
    Professor Ellen Sandseter
    Norway

    Ellen will give a brief presentation of the Norwegian context of out of school care and activities, what professions that work in these contexts, their background and competencies, how they are trained and the Norwegian view on the need for professionalizing these contexts.

    How has the theory of the Play Cycle supported professional practice?

    Dr Pete King
    Dr Pete King is a senior lecturer and researcher at Swansea University and the programme director for the MA Developmental and Therapeutic Play course. Pete has worked in play and playwork since 1996 in the statutory, third (voluntary) and business sectors in both England and Wales as a practitioner, development offer, trainer and educator. Pete has been published both nationally and internationally in peer-reviewed journals and contributed to book chapters. Pete is the co-editor with Dr Shelly Newstead of three books and co-wrote ‘The Play Cycle: Theory, Research and Implications’ with the late Gordon Sturrock. Pete’s current research is looking at how playwork has coped during the Covid-19 pandemic.
    Dr Pete King
    UK

    In 1998, Sturrock and Else (1998) within their conference paper ‘The Colorado Paper’ proposed a hierarchy of adult intervention to support children’s play.  This hierarchy was play maintenance, simple involvement, medial intervention and complex intervention.  In 2017, King and Newstead (2019, 2020) undertook two empirical studies, firstly on playworkers and secondly with childcare workers to study their understanding of the Play Cycle.  One aspect was how has the Play Cycle supported professional practice.  This presentation will outline the results of this study and offer a way for practitioners to record children’s Play Cycles using the Play Cycle Observation Method (PCOM) (King, 2020, King, Atkins and Burr, 2020).

    The Professional OSC Workforce in Scotland - a Ten-year Perspective

    Andrew Shoolbread
    Andrew Shoolbread MA(Hons) MSc MEd PgAdvDip Policy and Research Manager, Scottish Out of School Care Network Andrew has been working with the Scottish Out of School Care Network (SOSCN), the national intermediary charitable organisation representing school-age childcare in Scotland, since 2001. He currently has a particular focus on workforce issues and development, including conducting an annual OSC workforce survey. Prior to working for SOSCN he taught English and communication in Japan and Spain. He is also a qualified bookbinder.
    Andrew Shoolbread
    UK

    Professional regulation of the out of school care workforce, with associated qualification and training requirements, has been in place since 2011 in Scotland. This presentation will provide an overview of these workforce requirements and reflect on their impacts, both positive and negative. 

    Challenges and opportunities of after school education in Russia

    Picture 1
    Professor, D.Sc. of Pedagogic Sciences, Head of the Pedagogy Department at the Institute of Psychology and Education in Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan, 420021, Russia. Honored Scientist of the Republic of Tatarstan. Honored Worker of Higher Professional Education of the Russian Federation. The President of Janusz Korczak Society in Russia, member of the Board of the International Korczak Association (IKA). She is the national representative in the International Study Association on Teachers and Teaching (ISATT). Member of the Americal Educational Research Association. Editorial Board member of the Journal of Advances in Higher Education (JAHE). Review Editor in Teacher Education, part of the journal(s) Frontiers in Education. Editor in Chief of the journal Education and Self Development.
    The first researcher of Janusz Korczak pedagogical ideas and practice in the former Soviet Union (PhD dissertation,1982). Her D.Sc. of Pedagogic Sciences Dissertation “Theory and Practice of humanistic education in the XXth century European Pedagogy” (1997) presents the analysis of the historical and theoretical foundations and guidelines for humanization of the educational process in school, contains the original concept of conditions for the realization of humanistic education. She is a well-known scientist in Russia in the sphere of humanistic education, the author of more than 300 scientific books and articles. E-mail: valeykin@yandex.ru
    Roza A. Valeeva
    Russia

    Latest Publications

     

    Gulnara F. Biktagirova a, Roza A. Valeeva a, Roman S. Nagovitsyn (2021) Reflexive Teacher: Main Difficulties of the Reflexive Activity of Teachers with Various Pedagogical Work Experience. European Journal of Contemporary Education. 10(1): 18-28. DOI: 10.13187/ejced.2021.1.18

     

    Gafurov, I., Kalimullin, A., Valeeva, R., Rushby, N. (Eds.) (2020). Developing Teacher Competences: Key Issues and values. New York: Nova Science Publishers. ISBN 9781536182279

     

    Valeeva, R. and Kasimova R. (2020). Supplementary education in Russia. In S. Bae, J. Mahoney, S. Maschke, & L. Stecher (Eds.), International developments in research on extended education: Perspectives on extracurricular activities, after-school programs, and all-day schools. Berlin: Barbara Budrich Publishers, pp.265-284. ISBN: 9783847423355

     

    Valeeva, R.A. & Kalimullin, A.M. (2019). Learning To Teach In Russia: A Review of Policy and Empirical Research. In Tatto, M.T. and Menter, I. (Eds.) Knowledge, Policy and Practice in Teacher Education: a Cross-National Study (pp. 193-213). London: Bloomsbury. https://books.google.ru/books?id=DsqFDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&hl=ru#v=onepage&q&f=false

     

     Valeeva, R., & Kalimullin, A. (2019). Teacher education in Russia. In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.446

    Dr. Professor, Head of the Pedagogy Department, Institute of Psychology and Education, Kazan (Volga region) federal university, Russia

    After school (supplementary) education of children as part of the Russian Federation education system has acquired its main characteristics only in the 90s of the past century. Supplementary education of children has grown from non-formal education, which has in its history a hundred years of activity in Tsarist Russia and then in the Soviet Union. Russian system of extended  education of children is formed on the basis of extracurricular institutions. The emergence of the first extracurricular institutions for children in Russia is connected with the names of S.T. Shatsky (1922) and A.U. Zelenko (1938).

     

    The suggested Russian strategic “Conception of supplementary education of children development” (2014) was a timely step. This document has led to important changes in policy direction with serious consequences in terms of the structure and curriculum of after school education. The purpose of the Concept is to ensure children’s rights to development, personal self-determination and self-realization, the expansion  of capabilities to meet the diverse interests of children and their families in the area of extended education, the development of innovative potential of the state.


    Improving the quality and availability of the after school education for every child; updating the content of an extended education of children in accordance with the interests of children, families and the needs of society; infrastructure development of extended education of children, including through the provision of investment attractiveness; creating conditions for the participation of the family and the community in the management of the extended education of children system development lie in the heart of the reform.


    The reform efforts involve a significant change, not only within organization but also within the content of teaching. The paper is devoted to the main trends and results of scientific and innovative activity in the field of after school education in Russia, design and construction of a highly efficient educational system. The paper reveals history and the role of after school education in Russia as well as the main challenges and opportunities in the development of after school education policy. The paper presents the new concepts and approaches to after school education in Russia, as well as their implementation in different educational institutions.


    The main data sources are the reviews and subsequent after school education regulations policy documents in the Russian Federation; research papers on realization of the concept.


    References


    Conception of supplementary education of children development (2014).URL: http://government.ru/media/files/ipA1NW42XOA.pdf


    Shatsky, S.T. (1922).  Children – the future employees. Moscow: Rabotnik Prosvetschenia.


    Zelenko, A.U. (1938). Children’s parks. Moscow, Leningrad: Gosstroyizdat.

    Doug
    Doug is in his tenth year as General Secretary and Treasurer of the GFTU. He is the organisation's longest serving Executive member having first been elected to the EC in 1995. He served as the GFTU's President in 2007/2009 and was proud of making it possible in that time to rebuild trade union links with Vietnam and to inaugurate the now annual GFTU youth development weekend to help create a new generation of trade union leaders. Doug is the UK's longest serving trade union General Secretary, having been elected as the GS of the Community and Youth Workers' Union (CYWU - now part of Unite the union) in 1987. He was Secretary of the Coventry Trade Union Council for ten years and Secretary of the Coventry Miners' Support Committee in 1984/85. Doug is a prolific author of books and articles on many topics and a published poet and believes strongly that art and culture and history are essential to trade union education. Doug joined his trade union as a part time worker and eventually led the first successful campaign to win a national collective bargaining agreement for part time workers based on full parity. It was a ground breaking agreement. As a former competitive table tennis player, outside work you'll find Doug now admiring the devastating forehand shots of Ma Long or the backhand of Timo Boll on YouTube. He'll probably be doing this in his workshop where he likes to make things from wood for friends and family.
    Doug Nicholls
    UK

     

    Driven by how Hong Kong ECE curriculum has been infusing free play through their latest curriculum guidelines, this sharing will focus on how currently free play has been locally implemented. Mainly, there will be four main topics I will discuss. Firstly, as we have conducted years of study in understanding free play implementation in Hong Kong, we will unfold on how the conceptualization of free play has changed over the course of three years exploration. Then, development of an adapted mode of free play will also be discussed, as a solution for local practitioners in implementing free play. Thirdly, a shift of perspective by ECE practitioners in understanding child-centered approach will also be reviewed. Lastly, this discussion will be narrowed down to the raising concern towards children who live under the poverty line and under particular needs, specifically in having a comparably limited opportunity to have their own free play, compared to most children in Hong Kong.

    Two participated kindergartens (HK):

    Rhenish Mission School

    TWGHs Chan King Har Kindergarten

    Incorporating PARS into Everyday Practice

    20210506_130810
    I have been married almost 26 years, have 4 kids and 2 grandchildren. I always knew I would be a teacher of some sort, but I never realized I’d do most of my learning from the children. I took my 2-year Early Childhood Education and Development Diploma way back in the dark ages, the late 80’s. I have done a lot of professional development over the intervening years. I’ve been involved in helping get a conference for School Age Care up and running. This is my fifth school year with my current employer and have made leaps and bounds in my learning here. I am currently the Service Excellence Team Lead (helping ensure all 14 of our sites are maintaining government and company policies, staff support and training, etc.) and am currently enrolled in the PARS trainers course coming up in May. With well over 30 years in the business, I have worked in many environments. Nanny. Montessori. Home-based care. Religion-based. Themes. Cookie cutter. Then along came Playwork, and I found my niche! How freeing to be in an environment where the children are in charge of what they do! In my spare time, I like to visit with my grandchildren, read, play games, and I’ve made about 800 masks in the last year!
    Heather Boomhower
    Canada

    The benefits for the children being in an environment that is self-directed are plentiful! They are engaged and engrossed more deeply, there are fewer challenging behaviors due to the children being busier, and they get to create who they want to be in any situation. For the educators, being willing to step out of our comfort zones is a huge step forward, being able to play freely and without our own agendas meets some of our needs, and we are realizing our effects on children and their play just by being there makes us more aware and present.

    The result of adopting the PARS playwork practice is we are realizing that children know more about their wants, needs and abilities than most adults give them credit for. Seeing them learn so much about themselves and their interests is very humbling.

    My “aha!” moment came one afternoon when a child asked me what craft we were doing that day. I thought about it and wondered what the children could come up with on their own, without adult interference (adulteration), and told the child we were going to do things differently from now on and I was so excited to see what they could come up with from their own imaginations, instead of us telling and showing them what to make. That was my turning point. Reflecting on their interests and how best to incorporate these into what materials and supplies to provide took a lot of thinking, trial and error, organization, and a dedicated space for everything.

    On the spot reflections were very helpful in re-arranging the environment to best meet the children’s needs and make the best possible space for the children, in light of the fact that they have to share that space with us!

    Side by side: another way of working with children

    Baptiste pic
    Baptiste is a postdoctoral researcher at Université de Brest (France) working currently on residential school trips and outdoor education. His thesis was focused on children's play and animators' practices in out-of-school clubs and summer camps in France.
    Baptiste Besse-Patin
    France

    Based on a fieldwork study in several out-of-school clubs and summer camps in France as part of a PhD in educational sciences, this presentation analyses atypical practices of “animators”. Usually, if the organisation is based on a programme of activities led by the animators, alternating with free time (and few consideration given to play and the children’s initiatives, there are rare pedagogical experiments that challenge this animation practices. While the “pedagogical face-to-face” (an educator conducting an activity in front of a group of children) is no longer possible, there is an important shift to a “side-by-side” position (Paradise & Rogoff, 2009), another relationship with children that may recall the principles of playwork (unknown in France).

    kolbrun 2020
    Kolbrún Þ. Pálsdóttir is Dean of the School of Education at the University of Iceland, Reykjavik. She works with her colleagues to create a vibrant educational community with young people who have a passion to become professionals and future leaders within formal and informal education settings. In her academic work, Kolbrún has explored the connection between formal and informal learning, as children navigate their lives between school and out-of-school venues. She strongly believes that the way forward to a more sustainable future is to invest in a holistic education that promotes creativity and critical thinking; an education that empowers everyone to become active in shaping tomorrow’s world.
    Kolbrún Þorbjörg Pálsdóttir
    Iceland

     

    Education is the key for our communities to become more sustainable and better at coping with global and local challenges. In this presentation I will tell the (short) story of the leisure-time centers for young school-aged children in Reykjavík, the capital of Iceland. Their story bears witness to an increased understanding of three things: a) that learning happens within and outside of schools; b) professional collaboration is key to improvement; and c) children need to be happy and safe to learn. I will end my story by sharing my thoughts on some of the learning curves the Icelandic education community went through during the COVID pandemic, constant earthquakes and finally an eruption.

    Reflecting on the challenges of researching
    'after the child'

    Peter Kraftl
    Peter Kraftl is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Birmingham. An interdisciplinary scholar of childhood and youth, he is a Director of the University's interdisciplinary 'Children and Childhoods Network', which has over 200 members from across the campus and beyond. Peter is most interested in children's interactions with material things, environmental processes, and in their emotional and embodied lives. He has researched, amongst other things: children's experiences of urban environments; young people's understandings of food, water and energy; plastics; alternative education spaces; and school architectures. Peter is the author of 8 books and over 100 articles and book chapters. Peter's works regularly with local, national and international organisations - from informing Local Authorities about building more inclusive urban spaces for children, to his role as a co-ordinating lead author for UNESCO's current international review of education.
    Professor Peter Kraftl
    UK

    In this talk I will reflect on the challenges of researching ‘after the child’ whilst simultaneously being ‘pro-child’. My academic research has been part of a growing trend to ‘decentre’ children from childhood research. Whilst not seeking to ignore children, this research seeks to acknowledge that children – like all humans – are deeply inter-connected with a range of non-human things and processes. This acknowledgment has been particularly important for research (and practice) around children’s experiences of environmental changes and challenges – from the objects and resources they consume in their everyday lives to the forms of pollution or climate change they live with. Focusing on my recent work about children and plastics, I will discuss what I mean by doing research ‘after the child’, and how I have been trying to re-think environment, materiality and media in children’s lives in a way that might some ways be more powerfully ‘pro-child’ than other approaches to childhood research.

    Dr Fikile Nxumalo
    Dr. Fikile Nxumalo is an assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching & Learning at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her work is centered on environmental and place-attuned early childhood education that is situated within and responsive to children's inheritances of settler colonialism, anti-Blackness and environmental precarity. Her book, Decolonizing Place in Early Childhood Education (Routledge, 2019) examines the entanglements of place, environmental education, childhood, race, and settler colonialism in early learning contexts on unceded Coast Salish territories.
    Dr Fikile Nxumalo
    Canada

    My talk engages with what it might mean in research and in pedagogical practices, to affirm Black childhoods. I draw on my research that brings attention to the ways in which Black children continuously participate in making worlds that refuse and exceed the enclosures of anti-Blackness. I story possibilities for liberatory ways of engaging with Black children’s ways of being in places and spaces. I discuss the necessity and challenges of engaging Black childhoods in ways that create movement away from the individual developing child and instead consider the ways in which Black children can be seen as always in relation to people, materials, places, discourses – and more. I discuss the ways in which Black geographies have helped me to (re)conceptualize Black childhoods in relation to places, spaces and more-than-human beings, and the ways in which this shift towards spacialized and relational understandings is filled with potentialities for (re)storying Black childhoods in affirmative ways.

    Installing a nature play space in a disused inner city park

    RickPic
    Rick Worch, Ph.D., is a professor in the Inclusive Early Childhood Education Program at Bowling Green State University in the United States. Rick’s research is focused on children’s play and learning in formal and informal settings. He began his play research journey in 1993 by studying socioecological factors that impact the play of wild monkeys in Uganda and Costa Rica. Since about 2010, Rick has been fascinated with playwork and theories, philosophies, and empirical studies informing playwork practice. He is an associate editor of International Journal of Playwork Practice.
    Rick Worch
    USA

    To help our team install a nature play space in a disused inner city park in Toledo, Ohio USA, we invited local elementary school children to design it. The neighborhoods surrounding these schools lack natural spaces in which children are free to explore and play; therefore, we needed to provide children opportunities to interact with natural materials. Children were surprised to discover a variety of loose and fixed natural materials in their schools’ play yards when they went out for recess. The natural materials included moveable and immoveable logs, tree cookies, tree stumps, branches and bamboo, hemp rope, canvas tarps, shells, leaves, rocks, mud, water, sand, and clay. Manufactured materials, such as shovels, pails, paint brushes, a stream table, and mud kitchen were also available. Teachers agreed to allow members of Toledo Zoo’s Education Department, who are trained in some of the fundamental practices of playwork, to set up and support the recess experiences.

    After these experiences, teachers showed videos of children playing in natural playgrounds and provided photographs of features often found in natural playgrounds. Children were then given art materials to draw and write about the kinds of features with which they would like to play in their new neighborhood park. I will share with you the children’s artwork and renditions of their works by a professional artist for us to present to our funding agency for approval to build, as well as some key observations of children interacting with the materials and each other during recess.

    Dr Chan
    Dr CHAN Po Lin, Pauline is a currently serving senior lecturer under the Early Childhood Education Department of The Education University of Hong Kong. Aside from her role as the Associate Head of Teaching and Learning, she has been contributing to the community through various community services, talks and seminars. Her research focuses on child play and well being.
    Dr Pauline Chan
    Hong Kong

     

    Driven by how Hong Kong ECE curriculum has been infusing free play through their latest curriculum guidelines, this sharing will focus on how currently free play has been locally implemented. Mainly, there will be four main topics I will discuss. Firstly, as we have conducted years of study in understanding free play implementation in Hong Kong, we will unfold on how the conceptualization of free play has changed over the course of three years exploration. Then, development of an adapted mode of free play will also be discussed, as a solution for local practitioners in implementing free play. Thirdly, a shift of perspective by ECE practitioners in understanding child-centered approach will also be reviewed. Lastly, this discussion will be narrowed down to the raising concern towards children who live under the poverty line and under particular needs, specifically in having a comparably limited opportunity to have their own free play, compared to most children in Hong Kong.

    Two participated kindergartens (HK):

    Rhenish Mission School

    TWGHs Chan King Har Kindergarten

    Childhood and International Human Rights Law

    Naomi pic
    'Naomi is an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, Faculty of Law
    Dr Naomi Lott
    UK

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child succeeded in gathering near-universal ratification. However, challenges have remained concerning how childhood has been perceived in the Convention and in the implementation of children’s rights. Human rights law is accepted as being temporally fluid, which allows for rights to be adapted over time to the current context. This is critical, for example, when dealing with issues such as climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic. This fluidity also applies to childhood itself – children can be seen as both ‘beings’ and ‘becomings’ – which brings its own challenges and opportunities for international law.

    Grant Lambie Photo1
    Grant Lambie is an independent free play advocate, who has been involved in over 45 UK adventure playgrounds, (plus schools, parks and estates play areas) over the last 20 years. Enhanced from a background of nursing for people with intellectual disabilities, fine art and design.
    Grant Lambie
    UK

    Power Point to Adventure.

    British adventure playground practice though images.

    There are two parts to this talk: first looking at a playworker’s experience of working and delivering projects on adventure playgrounds, second to see how PowerPoint and video teleconferencing enable other ways of disseminating playwork information globally.

    Young people don’t learn in isolation or fragmentation, so over the 20mins I will try to give a total picture of adventure playgrounds (mainly around the physical environment). This is not the only picture, just one of many. This I hope will join many threads together to give a focus to adventure playgrounds and adventure play.

    Over the past 20 years I have been involved in over 45 adventure playgrounds around the UK. This has taken the role of playworker, senior playworker, structure building, reopening adventure playgrounds, teaching, workshops and more.

     

    Marianne Schüpbach Professor Dr.

    Schüpbach
    Marianne Schüpbach Professor Dr. is a chair in Primary Education at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. Schuepbach is an empirical researcher whose research focuses on extended education (all-day school, afterschool etc.) predominantly in Switzerland and Germany, school career transitions as grade retention, school teaching and school. In the last years, she has carried out different studies funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the German Research Foundation and starting in 2021 from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in the field of extended education, multi-professional collaboration in school and teaching and acculturation of immigrant students. She received her PhD from the University of Fribourg, Switzerland (CH) in 2004 and her Habilitation from the University of Bern (CH) in 2009. From 2010 till 2014 she has been an assistant professor of research on teaching and school at the Institute of Educational Science, University of Bern (CH) and from 2014 till 2019 she was a chair in Primary Education at the Institute of Educational Science, University of Bamberg, Germany.
    Professor Marianne Schüpbach
    Germany

    How can professionalism in the field of extended education be achieved in a school offering extended education, e.g. an all-day school in Germany or Switzerland, and aiming at providing a coordinated educational entity, or whole. Research findings from the United States and the German-speaking parts of Europe have shown that high quality in extended education is essential for children and young people’s positive development. More specifically, qualified staff and collaboration between staff members have been identified as key factors of quality in extended education. In other words, to ensure professionalism there needs to be a stronger focus on the education and training of both teachers and other educational staff in the future.

    To offer extended education offerings such that there is educational unity between teaching and extended education activities, as is for instance expected of all-day schools, and thus to create a new school with an expanded school day, a common basic university-based education for teachers and other educational staff is needed. Basic university-based education of this kind is already available in Sweden, for instance. In Sweden most of staff working with School-Age Educare activities are trained School-Age Educare teachers who have completed a three-year university-based teacher education program. This model of common basic education makes it possible to create a common pedagogical basis for the different actors in the school context. Furthermore, this is a way to create a central foundation and conditions for equal cooperation of all actors in the school. Moreover, common education provides a means to increase the prestige of the work of staff in extended education activities and offerings. Further, it is needed a quality framework for all-day schools. It also requires management responsibility, which is either in the hand of school principals or other management staff, and includes leadership in organization and management, personnel management and moderating, and full-day management as pedagogical management. These, in turn, require specific competencies of the school management, which must be built up. Another central basis for bringing together teaching and extended education into an educational whole is a curriculum that covers both education and care.

    In summary, these statements show that the discussion on professionalism in the field of extended education addresses the development of professionalism of the occupation as a whole, the individual development of professionalism, and the emergence of a professional identity. Furthermore, it can be noted that it is necessary to understand professional development as a long-term process that needs to be supported and must be advanced on various levels by different stakeholders.